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How To Identify and Engage The Best Talent For Your Organization


Rachel Kline with Authority Magazine interviewed our very own Deanna Baumgardner and they discussed finding good talent and keeping them engaged in their roles.


"Be thorough and thoughtful but quick and decisive so as to not lose good candidates through the process. And honestly, to not drag people along. Nobody wants to go through that, so don’t do it to people. This is why having a mapped out recruiting and hiring process is so important, so that it is easier to identify who does and doesn’t match the role therefore making it easier to make a decision and keep the process and candidates moving in a reasonable timeframe."

Deanna speaks about her "backstory" of how she fell into HR, while also inquiring about her funniest mistake and what she learned from it.


Deanna also shared her three favorite Life Lesson Quotes and why she chose them.


1. Entrepreneurship is living a few years of your life like most people won’t so that you can spend the rest of your life like most people can’t — Anonymous


2. Live in the solution, not the problem — Unknown


3. A smooth sea never made a skilled sailor — Franklin Roosevelt


Read the article to find out why Deanna selected these quotes and how they have helped her throughtout her career.


Authority also wondered if Employers Advantage had any new exciting projects or things happening this year. We were excited to announce that EA will be doing some expanding to be able to server larger companies with 50-300 employees. Please follow our social media for more info on this expansion.

This series on how to identify and engage the best talent can be found on Authority Magazine website.



MAIN INTERVIEW QUESTIONS:

Can you share five techniques that you use to identify the talent that would be best suited for the job you want to fill? Please share an example for each idea.


1 . Know who we are as a company. In addition to our core values, we are very focused on boundaries and protecting our time and well-being. This team works extremely hard, and they hustle when they need to, but we do not glorify multi-tasking, being stressed, or overworked. We actually frown upon that, so if someone thrives in that environment and needs to feel all of those things to think they are important, they won’t thrive here. We know that about ourselves and can easily identify that as a key component of our culture that helps in identifying talent for our team.


2 . Ask the candidate what they are looking for in a company and their next role to see if it matches what the role is and what we can offer. Dig deep with this and ask for specifics about what is important to them as individuals. Again, we aren’t just looking for someone to join our team, the candidates are looking for where they want to be. When you ask that question, it can really bring up a lot of things and be a good indicator of whether or not there is compatibility. If they are unsure of what they are looking for or if what they are looking for are things that we aren’t able to offer, that’s telling in itself.


3 . Be thorough and thoughtful but quick and decisive so as to not lose good candidates through the process. And honestly, to not drag people along. Nobody wants to go through that, so don’t do it to people. This is why having a mapped out recruiting and hiring process is so important, so that it is easier to identify who does and doesn’t match the role therefore making it easier to make a decision and keep the process and candidates moving in a reasonable timeframe.


4 . Know the role and what makes someone successful in that role. By having those characteristics and that work experience in mind, I ask questions that are designed to solicit the information that I am looking for. Meaning, I ask very specific questions, even actual situations that we’ve encountered with clients, and then asking the candidate to walk me through what they would do in that situation. I also ask them very specific behavioral-based questions to get an idea of how they handled certain situations at work, with employees, co-workers, etc. Outside of that, I ask them how they got into HR and their philosophy of what HR is and our role in an organization. That’s important to me because the philosophy of HR needs to align, not to mention that when you ask someone how they got into HR, it’s usually a good story and that relaxes people and helps them be more open.


5 . Be realistic. There have been a lot of times that I’ve talked to really great people through the hiring process, but they either didn’t have the experience we needed at the time, they needed something that we weren’t able to provide, or some other reason, when I really thought about it and looked at it realistically, it wouldn’t work and I have to pass on the candidate. The other part of being realistic is sharing the good, bad and the ugly with candidates and not being blind to the fact that there may be difficulties that the person runs into in the role. There are difficulties in any job and at any company, but it’s how they are handled is what makes the difference. If you aren’t realistic, it can really set someone up for failure and create turnover.


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